Another nail in the coffin of the mobile Neolithic theory! Cartoon by Phil Millar (Pedro)
 
Harry Mount, writing for Newsweek in June, reports on the recent reconstruction of five Neolithic roundhouses at the new  Stonehenge Visitor Centre. The reconstructions reveal how people, 4,500 years ago, may have lived at the time –
 
At first glance, we could be forgiven for thinking they were built in the modern age. Certainly, their building techniques are very similar to those used on Victorian cottages in nearby Wiltshire villages. The walls were made from cob, a mixture of the local chalk and hay, slapped, when wet, onto seven-year-old hazel stakes. These walls were then topped with thatched roofs, made from knotted straw tied onto a woven hazel frame.
 
Far from being dark, little Hobbit spaces, the interiors are surprisingly bright, illuminated by the white chalk walls and floors, and open door. A tall man can easily stand up straight inside. In the middle of the room, the ash-log fire on the hearth sends up smoke, which seeps through the thatch. As the smoke slowly dissipates, it creates a thin carbon dioxide layer against the straw that stops any spark from the fire igniting the thatch. As if that weren’t ingenious enough, the thatch expands in the rain, providing an even more waterproof membrane.
 
Full Newsweek article here.