La Cotte de St Brelade. Image credit Man vyi. Source Wikipedia

Sara Palmer, writing for BBC News Jersey earlier this month, reports that –
 
Jersey’s rich ice age history is being used in an attempt to attract more tourists to the island.
 
“Jersey has a story to tell about human evolution relevant across Europe and the wider world,” according to Dr Matt Pope, who is leading an archaeological team. Previous work has uncovered hunting sites and submerged ice age landscapes ranging from the earliest occupation by Neanderthals more than 250,000 years ago, to the arrival of the first modern humans.
 
The creation of ice age walking trails around the island’s coast has been done by Jersey Heritage in partnership with the archaeological team, Societe Jersiaise and the National Trust for Jersey. It has been supported by a £199,000 grant from the Tourism Development Fund (TDF) to deliver Ice Age Island. Peter Funk, chairman of the TDF panel, said: “There is a huge level of interest in archaeological discovery and Jersey has a unique story to tell which we believe will be an integral part of Jersey’s tourism offering in the years to come.”
 
Jersey has an exceptionally rich record for the Stone Age considering the small size of its land mass. The site of La Cotte de St Brelade contains more Neanderthal artefacts than the rest of the British Isles put together and ranks as one of the world’s richest Stone Age localities.
 
Full article here.