The Hurlers Stone Circle. The Cheesewring formation is just visible on the skyline
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The Heritage Trust

Our 2013 Outreach Event began on Friday, 21 June with a misty, early morning visit to the Hurlers Stone Circle, just a short walk from our base at the Cheesewring Hotel at Minions. The mist lent an eerie feel to the circle (actually three separate circles although little now remains of one) the stones standing clear one moment and then shrouded the next. Ditto the Cheesewring outcrop in the distance, which we were to visit later in the day. Close by to the Hurlers are the two solitary Pipers Stones which we visited before heading back to the hotel to meet our friend and guide, Mr Roy Goutté.

The two solitary Pipers Stones
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The Heritage Trust

Roy arrived at 11:30 with his dog Chief and, after introductions, we set off to Trethevy Quoit. Roy has researched Trethevy Quoit extensively and written about it in his book Trethevy Quoit: Cornwall’s Megalithic Masterpiece. It was a delight to stand in front of this megalithic masterpiece and listen to Roy explaining how it might have originally looked.

Trethevy Quoit
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The Heritage Trust

Lunch at the Crows Nest pub and then back to the Minions for the hike up to the Cheesewring outcrop, stopping off on the way to inspect the Rillaton Barrow and the strange effervescent lichen that inhabits its interior.

Rillaton Barrow
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The Heritage Trust

The natural rock formations of the Cheesewring are something to behold, and it’s astonishing that they were nearly totally destroyed by quarrying during the 19th century. As it is the quarrying stopped just short of the Cheesewring formations (and associated earthworks) and have now become well-known both nationally and internationally. The Cheesewring itself was well worth the visit but if it hadn’t been for Roy we would probably have missed the Neolithic cups (natural?) and man-made channels carved out of one of the upper stones.

Two of the natural Cheesewring outcrops (the rubble in the foreground is a manmade Neolithic defence work)
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The Heritage Trust

Neolithic cups and channels carved out of one of the upper stones of the Cheesewring
©
The Heritage Trust

Day two of our Event started with a visit to the small but beautiful Duloe Stone Circle. The circle (the smallest in Cornwall) was first recorded in 1329. It consists of eight stones of white quartz, the largest weighing up to nine tons.

The Duloe Stone Circle
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The Heritage Trust

Day three of our Event involved travelling further south to West Penwith and Lanyon Quoit. The quoit is tucked behind a hedge and the small layby is easily missed as it is not clearly signposted.

Lanyon Quoit
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The Heritage Trust

On the fourth and last day of our Event we met up with Roy again who kindly guided us to the enigmatic King Arthur’s Hall on Bodmin Moor. Roy has researched and filmed King Arthur’s Hall extensively (see his King Arthur’s Hall and King Arthur’s Hall: A new discovery? features) and both he and others present on the day all agreed that it is something much more than a pound or watering hole for animals. There were some interesting suggestions on what it might be but until more archaeological work is done there the place remains a mystery.

From left to right. Moss, Geoff, Sue and Roy at King Arthur’s Hall
©
The Heritage Trust

The Event finished with a picnic (kindly provided by Roy) at the Trippett Stone Circle (see report below) where some of the sites we had seen over the last few days were discussed and promises made for another visit to Cornwall as soon as possible. We hope those who were unable to join us this year will be able to do so on our next visit to Cornwall, or on our 2014 Outreach Event next summer or autumn.

Just a note.
 
This is our 400th post since we first got going in November 2011. We’ve had 32,382 hits since then and are attracting a steadily increasing number of followers from around the world. So, a really big thank you to all who have contributed features, photos etc, or have left comments, done background research or ‘just’ typed things up for publication.
 
Hoping that, together, we can continue to raise awareness of our precious heritage and the on-going need for its care and protection.