Leaves from a Psalter by William de Brailes. The Making of the Folio Society facsimile limited edition – the first ever medieval manuscript printed on vellum

The Folio Society of Great Britain has announced the publication of the first medieval manuscript to be printed on vellum. Seven surviving leaves from a 13th century psalter, created by William de Brailes, have been restored to their original glory in this first-of-its-kind facsimile edition. The Folio Society reports that –

William de Brailes was at the forefront of a great artistic flourishing in 13th-century England. One of the very few illuminators to sign his work, his name appears in several records between c.1230 and 1260, making him the best-documented artist of the period. Little is known of his personal life other than that he lived and worked in Oxford and that he had a wife – a fact somewhat at odds with two portraits of himself in a tonsure, which would suggest he had taken monastical vows. De Brailes’s consummate skill as an artist and craftsman is evidenced in seven leaves that survive from a Psalter completed around 1240. Regarded as the finest examples of his work, six of the leaves belong to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge and the seventh to the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York.

The Folio Society is proud to announce the publication of a limited facsimile edition of all seven Leaves from a Psalter by William de Brailes. These are no ordinary reproductions – the leaves are restored to their original glory and printed on vellum using a revolutionary and now patented printing process.

More here.